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What Is Smishing? How Scammers Use Texts to Steal Your Data – AARP

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Scams & Fraud
Scams & Fraud

En español | The word “smishing” comes from combining “SMS” — for short message service, the technology behind texting — with “phishing,” the practice of stealing personal or financial information through deceptive communications, primarily emails. Basically, it’s phishing by another means, namely text messages on mobile devices.
Like phishing emails, smishing texts are social-engineering scams that aim to manipulate people into turning over sensitive data such as Social Security numbers, credit card numbers and account passwords or providing access to a business’s computer system. They rely on persuading you that the sender is a familiar or trusted source and that urgent action is needed to secure a benefit, resolve a problem or avert a threat.
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For example, you might get what looks like a text from a company you do business with, such as your bank, a mobile provider, or a tech service like Netflix or PayPal. It claims your account has expired or been locked on some pretext, maybe suspicious activity, and you need to provide personal information or click on a link to reactivate it. That gives the scammers means to steal your money or identity or to infect your device with malware.

Variations abound. A scam text might say you’ve won a lottery prize or a gift card, or promise a break on student loan debt. It could look like an alert from a government agency such as Social Security or the IRS, or a message from FedEx or the U.S. Postal Service about a package delivery. It may link to a phony invoice or cancellation notice for a product or service you supposedly bought.
The coronavirus pandemic has unleashed a raft of new schemes, according to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Scam texts offer bogus treatmentsstimulus funds, supposed government health updates or warnings that you’ve been exposed to the virus.
Smishing texts now outnumber scam phone calls, according to call-blocking service Robokiller. The company’s 2021 mid-year report projects that by the end of the year Americans will have received 86 billion scam texts a 55 percent increase from 2020 — compared to 71 billion crooked calls.
Based on data from the first half of the year, Robokiller estimates that those phishy messages will cost consumers $101 million in 2021.

Still, smishing is comparatively less well-known than related tools like phishing and malware, according to the 2020 State of the Phish study from cybersecurity firm Proofpoint. That knowledge gap can play into scammers’ hands.
"Because text messages can feel more personal than emails, users can be more vulnerable to smishing if they are not made aware of the dangers,” Proofpoint said.
Do’s
Don’ts
Updated September 24, 2021
Whether you have been personally affected by scams or fraud or are interested in learning more, the AARP Fraud Watch Network advocates on your behalf and equips you with the knowledge you need to feel more informed and confidently spot and avoid scams.
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